André Jarnvig Jensen

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The Stasis of Narrativity: Constructivism and substructuralist discourse

Fellini and constructivism
In the works of Fellini, a predominant concept is the concept of capitalist art. Debord uses the term ‘Lyotardist narrative’ to denote the role of the observer as artist. Therefore, the premise of pretextual constructive theory implies that class has objective value.
The characteristic theme of the works of Fellini is the rubicon, and some would say the collapse, of postcultural sexual identity. The subject is contextualised into a substructuralist discourse that includes culture as a whole. Thus, the meaninglessness, and eventually the fatal flaw, of Lyotardist narrative prevalent in Fellini’s 8 1/2 is also evident in La Dolce Vita.
The main theme of de Selby’s[1] analysis of Derridaist reading is a self-referential reality. But the subject is interpolated into a Lyotardist narrative that includes sexuality as a whole.
Debord uses the term ‘constructivism’ to denote not materialism, but submaterialism. In a sense, the primary theme of the works of Pynchon is a capitalist paradox.
Finnis[2] holds that we have to choose between Lyotardist narrative and cultural socialism. But an abundance of deappropriations concerning neoconstructivist theory may be found.
Constructivism and cultural Marxism
“Class is dead,” says Lacan. Substructuralist discourse states that academe is part of the dialectic of art. However, if constructivism holds, the works of Pynchon are empowering.
In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. The subject is contextualised into a postmodernist narrative that includes culture as a totality. But Baudrillard uses the term ‘cultural Marxism’ to denote the difference between society and class.
The characteristic theme of d’Erlette’s[3] essay on subtextual dialectic theory is a self-justifying reality. The main theme of the works of Pynchon is the meaninglessness, and some would say the fatal flaw, of postconceptual reality. Therefore, Baudrillard uses the term ‘substructuralist discourse’ to denote the role of the observer as participant.
In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the concept of cultural truth. Von Junz[4] implies that we have to choose between constructivism and the materialist paradigm of consensus. But Sontag suggests the use of subtextual theory to attack capitalism.
“Class is intrinsically meaningless,” says Bataille. Lacan uses the term ‘constructivism’ to denote a dialectic whole. In a sense, in Mason & Dixon, Pynchon denies cultural Marxism; in Gravity’s Rainbow, however, he deconstructs postconstructivist textual theory.
The primary theme of Abian’s[5] model of substructuralist discourse is not desituationism, as Derrida would have it, but predesituationism. The main theme of the works of Pynchon is a self-sufficient totality. Therefore, if neotextual nihilism holds, we have to choose between substructuralist discourse and cultural appropriation.
Bataille promotes the use of cultural Marxism to analyse and modify society. In a sense, the premise of substructuralist discourse suggests that language serves to entrench sexism.
Bailey[6] holds that the works of Pynchon are reminiscent of Cage. It could be said that several discourses concerning the role of the poet as writer exist.
Bataille uses the term ‘constructivism’ to denote a subdialectic whole. But the primary theme of Sargeant’s[7] essay on postpatriarchial socialism is the bridge between sexual identity and class.
The subject is interpolated into a cultural Marxism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that any number of dematerialisms concerning materialist predialectic theory may be revealed.
If cultural Marxism holds, we have to choose between substructuralist discourse and structural discourse. In a sense, the subcultural paradigm of reality states that consciousness is part of the dialectic of sexuality, but only if Debord’s analysis of substructuralist discourse is valid; otherwise, Sartre’s model of capitalist narrative is one of “the postdialectic paradigm of context”, and therefore fundamentally unattainable.
In Dogma, Smith affirms constructivism; in Clerks he deconstructs substructuralist discourse. Thus, Foucault uses the term ‘constructivism’ to denote the rubicon of textual society.
The main theme of the works of Smith is the role of the poet as participant. It could be said that Lyotard suggests the use of Batailleist `powerful communication’ to challenge hierarchy.

André Jarnvig Jensen

 

Notes
1. de Selby, R. (1994) Constructivism in the works of Pynchon. University of North Carolina Press
2. Finnis, G. N. L. ed. (1986) Deconstructing Surrealism: Substructuralist discourse and constructivism. Panic Button Books
3. d’Erlette, M. (1975) Constructivism and substructuralist discourse. University of Oregon Press
4. von Junz, W. K. ed. (1982) The Narrative of Futility: Constructivism, neodialectic sublimation and nihilism. Loompanics
5. Abian, Z. W. E. (1977) Substructuralist discourse and constructivism. And/Or Press
6. Bailey, G. Q. ed. (1992) Forgetting Derrida: Substructuralist discourse in the works of Smith. Yale University Press
7. Sargeant, R. (1975) Nihilism, constructivism and textual sublimation. Panic Button Books

 

The essay you have just read is completely meaningless and was generated by the Postmodernism Generator.

 

André skeez screenshot 4 blass andré skeez småred Bilde 2 - André Jensen vs Lars Rubix

 

André Jarnvig Jensen battlerrap vs Dobbel (Sindre Stordal) på Blå i Oslo. 22.02.2014.

André Jarnvig Jensen battlerrap vs Dobbel (Sindre Stordal) på Blå i Oslo. 22.02.2014.

 

16. mai 2014
Skrevet av Marianne Zamecznik

Kategorier: André Jarnvig Jensen